Slovak word of the day

Myslieť – Think

Example:

Čo si myslíte? (formal) or Čo si myslíš?  (informal) – What do you think?

Take note:

Čo tým myslíš? or Čo máš na mysli? – What do you mean?

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Slovak Words of the day (probably also month)

I know, I know.  I have been very lazy.  I haven’t really learned a new Slovak word a day over the last several months.  I’m embarrassed and I’m not proud of it.  I will not give myself any excuses.  It was really all my fault.  I did, however, write down a few Slovak words that I frequently encounter.  Any tips on how not to be lazy?

Bude – It will be (infinitive form)

Budem – I will be

Ponuka – Offer

Dovera – Trust

Potreba – Need, Potreby – Needs

Potrebujem – I need

Riešenie – Solution

Dohoda – Agreement

Nedohoda – Disagreement

Vyjednávanie – Negotiation

Pripraviť sa – to prepare,  Pripaveny – Prepared

Slobodny – Single

ľudia – People

človek – Person

Miestnosť – Room, miestnosti (plural)

Completed goal #32

32. Try go-kart racing – completed! (27.7.2013)

So last Saturday I tried go-kart racing for the first time.  I didn’t know what to expect but I must say I was pleasantly surprised to find out that the place was very well run.  They had electric go-karts (pollution free) and a modern facility.  The staff were not very helpful but I think it’s because of language barrier.  Luckily my friends were able to explain how to drive a go-cart to me.  They mentioned about a turbo button on the steering wheel which when pressed, will turbo charge the speed for about 10 seconds.  I didn’t get to experiment with it since I felt I was going fast enough without hitting the safety rail.  Ok, to be honest, I sucked.  I was the slowest driver.  You can see the race results in the picture below.  Anyway, it was still fun.  I already made a mental note to myself that next time I will not be such a wuss.

go cart

Slovak word of the day

Nikdy sa nevzdávaj – never give up

Today’s Slovak word of the day is actually a phrase.  There’s a story behind this.  I recently met a young Slovak police officer with the English phrase “never give up” tattooed on his forearm.  He spoke very little English. With my limited Slovak and his limited English, we somehow managed to have a brief but rather amusing conversation.  He told me his dream was to visit New York City someday. He said he had been learning English for a year.   He had the phrase tattooed on his forearm to motivate himself to learn English.  I told him in my broken Slovak that I should probably tattoo the same phrase but in Slovak on my forehead.  Not sure if he got my joke but he smiled politely.

I told him that I’m learning Slovak.  He gave me a surprised look and then he said, “Slovak is a very difficult language to learn”, as if to warn me.  He then proposed that we should have language exchange lessons.  I smiled and said, “samozrejme!”, but it was a lie and I knew it wouldn’t work.  Through the years, countless of Slovakians have offered me language exchange lessons.  It’s always the same proposal. They teach me Slovak and at the same time they get to practice their English on me. It sounds like a great idea but in reality, it takes a lot of patience to teach someone a new language. The fact is, not everybody is a good teacher.   It’s like you agree with a friend to swap cars for a week and then you realize what a bad idea it is because your friend’s car is a piece of junk.

Anyway, I really admire this young officer’s determination to learn English.  I do hope he will achieve his goals.  As I’m writing this I realize I’m way behind with my Slovak words this month.  Nikdy sa nevzdávaj!